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Kissing Sisyphus

2007

ink on paper, lights, mirror, rubber sheet, cast plastic figures

Birds have a single hole for excretion and reproduction. When birds have sex, they must align their holes to allow for the sperm to pass into the female. The holes, or vents, are called cloaca. (Certain species including many male waterfowl have a phallus, but most birds have just the cloaca vent, both male and female alike.)


It is awkward for the bodies of birds to have sex, to align holes amongst the wings and tails. It happens quickly but perhaps with many attempts.


In thinking about these awkward bodies in such fleeting moments of union, images of birds having sex were downloaded from the internet and then drawn in ink on paper. The drawings are meant to slow down the moment of copulation and put the bodies at ease, with grace and perhaps pleasure.


In Kissing Sisyphus, the drawings are lit by the light of the moon, or reflected light, and accompanied by birds. A rubber night sky curtains the window.